The Leslieviller will always be free to use.
Donations are sincerely appreciated.
  Follow activity on The Leslieviller
in your favorite social networks:

Thanks to our advertisers for keeping this site free to use! If you'd like to advertise on The Leslieviller, start with this information.

Dropped by The Jerk on Thursday Jan 5 and the lovely ladies there told me that at the end of January they will be closing. Seems the building was sold. They didn't know much else but I speculate some condo's will be popping up as that whole stretch of Broadview is currently a construction zone. 

Views: 1762

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

some people are scared of change...

where will people get their authentic Jamaican food now that the Real Jerk is gone?

I understand that some people will miss the Real Jerk. I think we should all stop making assumptions regarding what will happen to the space now that there is a new owner. Maybe something good will come of it.

 

Some people don't crawl out of their own bubble to see why change puts fear into people.  They should go visit Liberty Village or the Waterfront to see what modernization has brought to the City.  25 years ago Liberty Village was a very interesting place. Now it's unrecognizable, and feels like suburban Orlando.  The Distillery District is next, and Leslieville is well on it's way.  Soon they'll be asking to develop Molson Park.  The Exhibition Grounds, from what I understand, has a condo going in as well.  

There was a day Toronto had class.  Now it has condos everywhere, and the fine fine Entertainment District.  

Change like this: http://www.torontocondoteam.ca/garmentfactorylofts

chris said:

some people are scared of change...

where will people get their authentic Jamaican food now that the Real Jerk is gone?

I understand that some people will miss the Real Jerk. I think we should all stop making assumptions regarding what will happen to the space now that there is a new owner. Maybe something good will come of it.

 

You know, Toronto is made up of people mostly from elsewhere.  There are few people that were actually born here and continue to stay here.  That fact certainly is not news.  It's well known that Toronto's diversity stems from international sources, and not too many people know that the United Nations studies how this very diversity works.  It isn't achieved anywhere else in the world half as good as it does here.  But don't think it doesn't have repercussions on the City of Toronto.

Even when people are from Southern Ontario outside of the City, they move here and obviously have a different view of this place than the born-and-raised.  Downtown has a lot of history that I have witnessed over the years.  Even before I was born, Leslieville had a massive history.  I bet most people in Leslieville don't know the ramifications of the Simcoe Hotel.  In fact, I bet most people don't even know where it is.  

I love it when small town bumpkins come into Toronto and start ordering everything be demolished to put up tall buildings and bright lights.  Their fascination  with The Big City reminds me of little children with a big lollypop.  Kind of like how Rob Ford loves strip malls.  I personally have no need to feel I am a New Yorker, yet Toronto is constantly compared to New York.  I don't see why.  There's a lot I wouldn't like about it.  I'd rather Toronto be a polished Toronto than an imitation New York.  

So what some see as being averse to change, is just a respect for the past, or the current.  The value that we have for various parts of town, is the basis behind us moving to Leslieville.  It's why I upload the many photos to this site, and why I don't want the Port Lands to turn into a friction circus.  There are plenty of examples where new development is focussed on bringing people into the downtown core.  Examples that have little or no character, and are of poor quality.  Then there are fiascos like SE Pape & Queen.  We can only hope that the Pan-Am Village is a success, whereas The Showcase Lofts has had a lot of bad feedback, and they haven't even broken ground.  

The fact that most Torontonians are not originally from here is what makes this City as fantastic as it is. It's not the "small town bumpkin" that is changing the landscape of our great City (with the exception of Aragon, developers of the most disappointing useless P.O.S called Showcase which is only 55% sold but is set to break ground shortly). The Cityplace debacle is a result of one developer from Hong Kong and his ability to convince the City of Toronto to allow the poor quality mess Concord has created (Thanks Adam Vaughan).

Liberty Village is another example of terrible planning with zero regard for community and preservation. . Property values in Liberty have virtually leveled off as each new building that goes up is basically a newer clone of the previous. With these two developments I can see how you, and many others for that matter, feel the way you do about development.

The reason I moved here in 2001 was because I fell in love with the gritty vibe but loved the polish behind the scenes. It's also important to understand that our amazing Riverside/Leslieville community will never become a Liberty Village or CityPlace. We have strong community groups that have successfully lobbied against developments; the Leslieville Lofts just north of Queen on Broadview was shut down by the community and now a group of "Victorian Style" TH's are being built in its place. Another very recent example are the Urbancorp, ultra modern townhouses on Boulton were modified due to the pressure put on the developer by the community.

I agree The Simcoe Hotel on Eastern just west of the Hells Angels former clubhouse underwent a failed "restoration" in my opinion and was simply hidden within a townhouse development Although it wasn't the most pleasant place a decade or so before the development.

I have faith that the Portlands will be a huge success and will finally bridge the gap b/w downtown and the east end.


Scratch Egg said:

You know, Toronto is made up of people mostly from elsewhere.  There are few people that were actually born here and continue to stay here.  That fact certainly is not news.  It's well known that Toronto's diversity stems from international sources, and not too many people know that the United Nations studies how this very diversity works.  It isn't achieved anywhere else in the world half as good as it does here.  But don't think it doesn't have repercussions on the City of Toronto.

Even when people are from Southern Ontario outside of the City, they move here and obviously have a different view of this place than the born-and-raised.  Downtown has a lot of history that I have witnessed over the years.  Even before I was born, Leslieville had a massive history.  I bet most people in Leslieville don't know the ramifications of the Simcoe Hotel.  In fact, I bet most people don't even know where it is.  

I love it when small town bumpkins come into Toronto and start ordering everything be demolished to put up tall buildings and bright lights.  Their fascination  with The Big City reminds me of little children with a big lollypop.  Kind of like how Rob Ford loves strip malls.  I personally have no need to feel I am a New Yorker, yet Toronto is constantly compared to New York.  I don't see why.  There's a lot I wouldn't like about it.  I'd rather Toronto be a polished Toronto than an imitation New York.  

So what some see as being averse to change, is just a respect for the past, or the current.  The value that we have for various parts of town, is the basis behind us moving to Leslieville.  It's why I upload the many photos to this site, and why I don't want the Port Lands to turn into a friction circus.  There are plenty of examples where new development is focussed on bringing people into the downtown core.  Examples that have little or no character, and are of poor quality.  Then there are fiascos like SE Pape & Queen.  We can only hope that the Pan-Am Village is a success, whereas The Showcase Lofts has had a lot of bad feedback, and they haven't even broken ground.  

I'd say it's a part of it.  I was bringing up the imported attitudes towards the City.  The City is not in need of a huge influx of professionals that live in 600 square feet, 20 floors up.  The change of the landscape is indeed heavily influenced by the attitudes of newcomers into Toronto.  You don't have to look past the Mayor's position as witnessing just that.  Since he's been in power, he's shut down a lot of things which make Toronto a city that serves downtown.  He's used to Etobicoke.  He has stated he thinks parts of Etobicoke are as nice as Rosedale.  

So you admit that parts of Leslieville are going down the toilet.  City Place (which touches on Liberty Village) is indeed human chicken farming.  CP and LV don't have anything close to a Real Jerk.  It is once every what...50 years that you get an opportunity like Leslieville to move into the future.  I don't see Paula Fletcher pushing for bringing modern day fibre into Leslieville.  The power goes out here so often, and from what I read, it really frustrates the neighbourhood.  But Canada Post and the TTC get updated infrastructures every time they sneeze.  In the United States, the postal service is firing 28,000 people because of the nature of the market.  Transit around the world has surpassed the TTC quite some time ago.  Transit City is finished.  

The older buildings on Carlaw, I can see being transformed.  I think they did a great job with them.  Worklofts and Flatiron I see as a real kick in the teeth for Leslieville.  The Carlaw I won't even touch at this point.  

My Dad owned a building on Richmond St. E.  He also was on Queen East before that, by Church.  Old warehouse-style buildings in downtown, with large wooden skeletons, creaky wood floors and real Toronto red brick, was standard.  Not the yuppified versions, but the original buildings.  I hope you are right about the L/RS not becoming Liberty Village.  I saw a lot of old history erased with that swamping of new buildings.  I worked down there in 1984 and it was an incredible summer.  A lot of that industry and associated businesses are gone.  

The Simcoe Hotel had a bar in there for some time.  I believe it was quite the liberal queer bar with loads of wild stories that poured out into the streets.  It was raided often by police back in the day, as lifestyle divergence was somehow illegal.  But even before that, the Hotel's role in Toronto's "Hogtown" nickname, and in fact, the nature behind several large Leslieville and Riverside large plant-size buildings.  

Once we change, it's impossible to bring back the past.  A failure of the Port Lands will bring bad to the Port Lands and Leslieville.  

Just a quick reply to your comment "so you admit that parts of Leslieville are going down the toilet". I would say that I see Showcase Living swirling down the toilet bowl but aside from that I'm quite happy with projects under construction as well as those proposed developments currently in planing stages. Dundas and Carlaw will be a phenomenal intersection full of young life and energy (yes yes, we already know your position on these). Flatiron and Worklofts replaced a dirty gas station. The NW corner will also be developed and that will drive traffic north to Gerrard and improve that corner as well. I see a big bright future for this community and so do many others. That's why our property values have seen double digit growth year over year. That being said I would be cautious investing in pre construction at this point but our hood is on the right path.



Scratch Egg said:

I'd say it's a part of it.  I was bringing up the imported attitudes towards the City.  The City is not in need of a huge influx of professionals that live in 600 square feet, 20 floors up.  The change of the landscape is indeed heavily influenced by the attitudes of newcomers into Toronto.  You don't have to look past the Mayor's position as witnessing just that.  Since he's been in power, he's shut down a lot of things which make Toronto a city that serves downtown.  He's used to Etobicoke.  He has stated he thinks parts of Etobicoke are as nice as Rosedale.  

So you admit that parts of Leslieville are going down the toilet.  City Place (which touches on Liberty Village) is indeed human chicken farming.  CP and LV don't have anything close to a Real Jerk.  It is once every what...50 years that you get an opportunity like Leslieville to move into the future.  I don't see Paula Fletcher pushing for bringing modern day fibre into Leslieville.  The power goes out here so often, and from what I read, it really frustrates the neighbourhood.  But Canada Post and the TTC get updated infrastructures every time they sneeze.  In the United States, the postal service is firing 28,000 people because of the nature of the market.  Transit around the world has surpassed the TTC quite some time ago.  Transit City is finished.  

The older buildings on Carlaw, I can see being transformed.  I think they did a great job with them.  Worklofts and Flatiron I see as a real kick in the teeth for Leslieville.  The Carlaw I won't even touch at this point.  

My Dad owned a building on Richmond St. E.  He also was on Queen East before that, by Church.  Old warehouse-style buildings in downtown, with large wooden skeletons, creaky wood floors and real Toronto red brick, was standard.  Not the yuppified versions, but the original buildings.  I hope you are right about the L/RS not becoming Liberty Village.  I saw a lot of old history erased with that swamping of new buildings.  I worked down there in 1984 and it was an incredible summer.  A lot of that industry and associated businesses are gone.  

The Simcoe Hotel had a bar in there for some time.  I believe it was quite the liberal queer bar with loads of wild stories that poured out into the streets.  It was raided often by police back in the day, as lifestyle divergence was somehow illegal.  But even before that, the Hotel's role in Toronto's "Hogtown" nickname, and in fact, the nature behind several large Leslieville and Riverside large plant-size buildings.  

Once we change, it's impossible to bring back the past.  A failure of the Port Lands will bring bad to the Port Lands and Leslieville.  

I just think there would be a happy medium between the gas station and what's currently going up.  The current building wasn't the only option for that location.  NW as in the "Wedge"?  Or the very NW?  So Carlaw & Dundas will all be a minimum of 10 floors?  Why limit it to 10 floors then?  Why not go up 80 floors?  It's not like people will be enjoying the view if 10 floors is the limit.  

I disagree that property values are driven by crowded places.  My neighbours don't like the density increase on Carlaw.  In fact, people on Badgerow have sold because of it, and some on Boston as well.  How towering density is the provider of a "bright future" escapes me.  Smart street-level residential or major-street smart development, not necessarily sky-high sardine can residences, are what I think most people expect.  The Broadview Hotel remake, The Duke remake, and perhaps Stratengers remake, would all be excellent additions.  The Film Lands...80 floors?  120 floors?  Much like what's going into The Distillery?  That is a huge failure.  Ugly destruction of heritage buildings for the sake of shoehorning thousands of people...all for the sake of celebrating the lands they demolish...it's crazy.  

Once it's done and the repercussions are being felt, don't say it wasn't mentioned.  We have to live with the bad Waterfront and Liberty Village for decades to come.  

You certainly have a way with words Scratch. Yes, I was referring to the wedge on the NW corner. Don't know what it will be yet.

I'm sure your neighbours on Badgerow and Boston made a healthy profit from their sales too. Hopefully they'll find an insulated corner in Toronto somewhere with no vacant land around them for future development.

don't bother argueing with Scratch Egg.

His thoughts are all over the place and he sounds like he is educated but smoking something...lol

 



Ara Mamourian said:

You certainly have a way with words Scratch. Yes, I was referring to the wedge on the NW corner. Don't know what it will be yet.

I'm sure your neighbours on Badgerow and Boston made a healthy profit from their sales too. Hopefully they'll find an insulated corner in Toronto somewhere with no vacant land around them for future development.

Gentrification is Good for Leslieville!!

1)      Leslieville was a dump until recently (started improving in past 10 years)(I remember picking up my mom from Diamond Knitting Mills on Carlaw in the 70’s and 80’s it was disgusting down here)

2)      Leslieville started to become a great place to live when it started to gentrify- cool ‘yuppie’ restaurants like Leslie Jones, Frankly, Tomi Kro, Ruby Watch, Bonjour Brioche etc. moved in. (there was a time when real estate agents could barely sell properties on De Grassi)

3)      Leslieville continues to get cooler because yuppies are restoring the houses (removing angel stone from Victorians) and landscaping

4)      Leslieville has a strong ‘yuppie’ community that is against the Walmarts ,the Leslieville lofts, Jilly’s etc

5)      The Yuppies have made Leslieville livable- it used to be crawling with substance abuse tragedies night and day (I remember Jimmie Simpson Park in the 80’s and 90’s was a crack dump)

6)      Make fun of yuppies all you want, but who do you think was keeping Real Jerk open? Have you ever seen their prices for a meal with a drink? pricey

*I agree we must all continue to work together to ensure that the new buildings/condos reflect this neighborhood’s history.

Change will happen because this city has been mandated to grow its density and because cities/neighborhoods change over time as populations move around

(I personally have been sending feedback from blogs/tweets/facebook to Aragon’s upper management and was instrumental in helping change their initial design- although I still think it’s crap)

Heh so I've been told.  I believe it was your first report of the Wedge that indicated the new owner was slow to develop.  Any news on that front?  On that topic, how vulnerable are SW and NNW Carlaw & Dundas, the current two-level buildings?  

Badgerow & Boston made profits before the threat of 235 Carlaw.  They're moving because of that threat, which will decrease their property values, as the new building is presenting a pressure in the neighbourhood.  Well away from direct contact, traffic, transit and parking will indeed be affected.  345 Carlaw is not currently vacant, nor was it when they purchased.  It also currently has a City-imposed restriction to its current height.  The Carlaw will more than double it, perhaps triple it, with no City resistance whatsoever.  If that model is followed, then any corner on any street can easily shove in something that's purely convenient to developers, because we can't balance our books while unions continue to rape the City's finances.  And as people continue to preach, this City is meant for wiping down and shoving in tall condo buildings.  Preservation is hardly ever mentioned.  Large failed projects haven't taught anybody the lessons that need to be learned.  

Reply to Discussion

RSS

LESLIEVILLE ON TWITTER

© 2014   8844615 Canada Inc.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service